Catholics on Social Media

. . . if you are struggling with social media and are balking at the idea of giving up FB, Twitter, or whatever, just think about what your life was like just a few short years ago before these social media “drugs” existed. Just a few short years ago, you didn’t need to check your notifications, you didn’t need that rush EVER, because it didn’t exist. And you got along just fine. Think about how this is exactly the same as the person who has started drinking heavily or doing drugs just within the past few years, and is now addicted to drugs or alcohol who honestly believes that they can’t live without it.

You can live without it.

You CAN give it up.

You don’t NEED it.


I’ll beg you all again, for the sake of your souls, GET OFF OF SOCIAL MEDIA. Such potent toxicity! A spiritual drug made specifically to create and/or amplify narcissism. Flee! Leave and never look back! You can do it!
ANN BARNHARDT

There is only one individual who I think uses Twitter in a successful way. This is Matt Drudge who has no tweets posted on his account. He will post a tweet that will last a day before getting deleted. That one tweet will influence the news cycle for the next 24 hours. That’s not bad for a single tweet. But Drudge pulls this off by barely tweeting anything at all. His account is the equivalent of a bulletin board used for special notices. Otherwise, it is silent.

For everyone else on Twitter, the social media platform is a bad thing. It eats your time. It stokes your anger. It is an outlet for very bad behavior. And, you will probably have to go to confession for various mortal sins committed on the service.

As Aquinas put it, nothing is inherently good or evil, but its usage may make it so. Social media is potentially a good thing. But Eve thought eating the forbidden fruit was potentially a good thing, too. That is how temptation works. It promises you something good without including the cost. And when you indulge the temptation, you find that you are even denied the good you expected to get.

I am watching various Catholics on social media lose their minds. One of these people is Mark Shea. Another is Steve Skojec. Fred Martinez pointed this out recently on his Catholic Monitor blog. But other Catholics on Twitter fall prey to the same temptations and falls as Skojec. I know I did.

Quitting Twitter was an ordeal for me. They have truly crafted an addictive product with that service. Facebook has done the same thing. Once you know something is bad for you, the easiest way to defeat it is to cut it off completely. Fortunately, I managed to do it without cancelling my internet service. But I considered it.

I don’t know why any Catholic bothers being on social media. It isn’t worth the price of your soul to win some shouting match with a troll on Twitter. Even if you win the argument, the troll has already won by bringing you to his level of imbecility. This is what has happened to Steve Skojec on Twitter. Flame wars have scorched his good sense to a crisp and now he is a fool. Someone should tell him, but he is too busy tweeting to listen.

4 thoughts on “Catholics on Social Media

  1. Indeed, I can’t bring myself to even read their tweets even when others copy and paste them into articles. My use of FB and Twitter has been to use them as billboards for an article which I post but NEVER to engage in interaction. In fact, the dwindling FB audience has gotten so thin that I don’t even do that anymore.

    But Mark Shea and Steve Skojek have both driven me away from reading anything they write anymore and I used to read them both back in the day . . . though Shea fell first Skojek is just as bad these days.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Catholics and conservatives complain about deplatforming, but I think getting deplatformed is the best thing to happen to these people. It amounts to being evicted from a crack house.

      I get 4K+ hits monthly on the C-Blog from the strength of evergreen posts I put up years ago. The boost from Twitter became negligible when shadow banning came into effect.

      Here is an ironic post from Skojec:
      https://onepeterfive.com/our-dangerous-addiction/

      Like

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